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Pete Enns & The Bible for Normal People

New Testament

Train of Revelation

Who’s Up for A Little New Testament Quiz? (Sure you are. Do it.)

By Pete Enns, Ph.D.

We’re in finals week here at Eastern University, so I am in testing/grading mode. So here you go (all answers must be completed in the space provided): What do all […]

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Creative interpretation in the New Testament

What Permanently Screwed Me Up About the Bible (But It Turned Out Well)

By Pete Enns, Ph.D.

The New Testament writers had a habit of saying things about the Old Testament that are not in the Old Testament but are in these creative, Jewish writings of the period.

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Paul's biblical interpretation

Paul: Well, Technically Speaking, He’s Not REALLY “Winging It”

By Pete Enns, Ph.D.

What we might call a fast and loose use of the Old Testament was for Paul and his contemporaries a normal and expected approach to biblical interpretation—creatively connecting the past with the present.

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Paul New Testament Writer is Winging It

Paul: It Looks Like He’s Sort of Winging It

By Pete Enns, Ph.D.

Paul appeals to the Old Testament in order to support what is hardly an obvious notion to Jews at the time: that Jesus, a crucified and risen son of a working-class family, is the long-hoped for Jewish messiah and that Gentiles as Gentiles are full and equal partners along with Jews in this messianic age.

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romans

Open Letter to the Apostle Paul from a Concerned Reader

By Pete Enns, Ph.D.

Now, I know you believe, as we all do, that the Bible, being God’s word, is perfectly consistent all the way through, meaning it doesn’t mean one thing in the Old Testament and another thing when you quote it. It goes without saying that you respect the intention of the original author more than anyone, and you’d never mistreat the Bible like that.

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emmanuel

The “Pete Ruins Christmas” Series: The Virgin Shall Conceive

By Pete Enns, Ph.D.

Matthew interprets Isaiah creatively, not in keeping with what Isaiah meant. The child’s birth is not miraculous in Isaiah, but the deliverance of Judah from a military coalition is.

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